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Remember 1934!

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This month marks the 80th Anniversary of a series of important strikes in American history. The West Coast waterfront strike, the Toledo Auto-Lite strike and, closer to home, the Minneapolis trucker’s strike. All 3 of them were happening simultaneously in late Spring and Summer of 1934. The victories these strikes ended in (whether full or partial), set important precedents for industrial unionism, mass picketing, unemployed involvement, radicals being the decisive factor and breaking anti-union vigilante alliances.

Here in the Twin Cities, Remember ’34, a group created to commemorate the 80th Anniversary of the Minneapolis strike, is holding a series of events this weekend.

Thursday, July 17

“Revolutionary Teamsters: The Minneapolis Truckers’ Strikes of 1934″ book event, 6:30–9PM, Minneapolis Central Library, 2nd floor, Doty Board Room

In commemoration of the 80th anniversary of the 1934 truckers’ strikes, Canadian labor historian Bryan Palmer will talk about his book “Revolutionary Teamsters: The Minneapolis Truckers’ Strikes of 1934.” The strikes had state-wide significance and galvanized the labor movement in Minnesota.

Friday, July 18

Labor Movie Night, 6:00PM @ Bell Museum Auditorium

In 1934, a number of citywide and industry wide strikes changed the face of labor in this country. We’ll commemorate the 80th anniversary by sharing documentary footage of the most significant strikes of that year: West Coast Longshore Workers; Toledo Autolite Workers; Minneapolis Truckers; and Southern Textile Workers. This special screening is part of the commemoration of the 80th anniversary of the strike that made Minneapolis a town. Special guest speakers include Joe Burns, author of Reviving the Strike and Strike Back, and Bryan Palmer, author of Revolutionary Teamster. Screening will be at the Bell Museum Auditorium on the U of M Mpls. Campus, corner of University Ave. & 17th Ave SE.

Saturday, July 19

Teamsters march, 3PM, starting at Star Tribune printing plant

The public is welcome to join Teamsters Local 120 for a march to the “Bloody Friday” site from a staging area near the Star Tribune printing plant at 800 North 1st St., Minneapolis. Teamsters Local 120 is the successor local to Teamsters Local 574, which waged the historic 1934 strike. Earlier in the afternoon July 19, Teamsters Local 120 will host a rally and picnic for its members at Boom Island Park. For more information, contact Paul Slattery at 651-343-1714.

One Day in July: a Street Festival for the Working Class, 4PM-10PM, 3rd St & 7th Ave N, Minneapolis, MN

Featuring: I Self Devine, Tall Paul, MaLLy, Steve Kaul & The Brass Kings, Mad Dogs of Glory, Shannon Murray, The Blowout, Kalpulli KetzalCoatlicue Aztec Dance, The Little Thunderbirds Drum and Dance Troupe and more.

For the 80th anniversary of the events that “Made Minneapolis a Union Town” we are once again holding a street festival to commemorate the 1934 Teamsters strike and to remember and honor the victims of the “Bloody Friday” shootings.

Join us for this festival of Music, Art, Performance, Historical Displays, Food, and Speeches. We are not only commemorating the struggles of the past, but also pointing to the struggles of today and the future.

We will also be showcasing the design for a planned permanent historical marker on the site that we hope to place later this year.

Sunday, July 20

80th Anniversary Teamsters’ Strike Bike Tour, 10:30am, Peavey Plaza, Nicollet Mall and 11th Street

Bring your bike and join us in celebrating the 80th Anniversary of the Minneapolis Teamsters’ Strike by touring the important sites of the historic struggle and learning of their significance. The tour will terminate at the 80th Anniversary Picnic, where bikers can join the festivities that will include music, speakers, and food.

Depart at 10:30am from Peavey Plaza
Tour Historical Sites (Mostly Downtown)
Arrive at Minnehaha Park for Picnic celebration

80th Anniversary Picnic – Minnehaha Park, 12PM, 4655 46th Ave S, Minneapolis, MN

Descendants of participants in the 1934 Minneapolis Teamsters strikes will be honored at a picnic planned Sunday, July 20, from 12 noon to 4:00 p.m. at Wabun Picnic Area at Minnehaha Park in Minneapolis (follow Godfrey Parkway north from Minnehaha Falls, turn right into Wabun Picnic Area). The event will feature brief speeches, a free picnic lunch, children’s games, and music by folksinger Larry Long and others

To contact the planners of the July 19 street festival and July 20 picnic, e-mail remember1934mpls[at]gmail.com or phone 612-802-1482. A facebook page, www.facebook.com/remember1934, also provides updates and posts featuring “this week in strike history.”

Twin Ports Industrial Workers of the World

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For those further up north in Minnesota/Wisconsin, there’s a small group of Wobblies in the Twin Ports getting things going.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/twinportsiwwsolidarity
Email: iwwduluth@riseup.net
Mailing Address: PO Box 3232, Duluth, Minnesota 55803

YARD SALE (Complete w/PANCAKE BREAKFAST!!)

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Please come this Sunday the 22nd to a double header fundraiser for the Junior Wobblies! We are raising money to fund Junior Wobblies, an outdoor adventure and political education camp for the next generation of labor organizers!

From 10-4 we will be having a yard sale! All proceeds go to funding camp! Rain location will be inside 4200 Cedar.

ADDITIONALLY we will be having a PANCAKE BREAKFAST from 11-2! Vegan and vegetarian options available.

Date: Sunday, June 22, 2014, 10AM-4PM
Location: 4200 Cedar Ave S, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55407

IWW Picket of Harriet Brewing and Tap Room

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Harriet Brewing and Tap Room is holding a SCAB FUNDRAISER for Sisters Camelot, a business that the IWW has been striking for over a year, through the self-organized Sisters Camelot Canvass Union (SCCU).

Sisters Camelot fired one of these workers on th the IWW on March 4th, 2013. Since then, the workers have been on strike. The National Labor Relations Board has consistently ruled in favor of the striking workers, and Sisters Camelot responded with ever-more-embarrassing tactics: allowing a notoriously misogynistic union-busting lawyer, John Hauge, to represent them pro bono, and even encouraging an attack on IWW members on May Day (of all days, they attack us on a day memorializing the fight for the 8-hour day!).

The IWW has called for a Complete Boycott.

The following unions have signed solidarity statements and pledged to encourage and enforce the boycott: AFSCME 34, AFSCME 3800, CWA 7250, and TEAMSTERS 638. The Twin Cities General Defense Committee has also condemned the Sisters Camelot Collective and thrown their full solidarity to the striking workers.

These striking workers have endured over a year of precarious existence, living with extremely few means, all as a result of the Sisters Camelot collective and their allies engaging in classic capitalist union busting techniques.

These workers provided approximately 95% of the Sisters Camelot funding base, as canvassers. They are on strike. Supporting a fundraiser is SCAB WORK.

The IWW has always enjoyed the Harriet Brewing Tap Room. Immediately across from our office, we have supported it and been customers since day one.

We assumed that this error was merely that – an error made without knowledge and in good faith. We assumed that after we reached out to the manager and owner and explained the situation, they would cancel the event.

But for the past two weeks, through emails, documents dropped off at the tap room, and many many phone calls, the management of the Tap Room has refused to respond.

 

We went in one last time on Thursday, and explained that if they did not cancel the fundraiser, we would picket, and that this picket would hurt their business. This is, after all, the intent of any picket. We told them we didn’t want this to happen, especially to the workers at the brewery, but that we have to look out for our Fellow Workers in the union first and foremost. We practically begged them to cancel this event.

But they haven’t.

So on SATURDAY, JUNE 21st, WE WILL GATHER AS MANY WORKERS AND SUPPORTERS AS WE CAN AND PICKET THEIR PAID EVENT, BEGINNING AT 6 PM.

Show up at 5:30 on the sidewalk across the street from the brewery! Show your support for independent worker-directed unions! Show your refusal to allow scabs and bosses to rule our world!

And yes – this is going to be FUN. Bring your party mindset.

Time:5:30 PM, Saturday, June 21 2014

Place: 3036 Minnehaha Ave Minneapolis, MN 55406

Phone Blast Harriet Brewing!

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Sisters’ Camelot is a union-busting organization whose fundraising workers have been on strike since March 1, 2013 and have endured a long and brutal union-busting campaign by their bosses.

On May 4th a peaceful picket of the Sisters’ Camelot Kitchenbus was violently attacked by supporters of the union-busters at the May Day Festival. In response the Twin Cities IWW announced a complete boycott of Sisters’ Camelot whose canvass workers are still on strike. This boycott was endorsed by AFSCME Local 3800, AFSCME Local 34, Teamster Local 638, CWA Local 7250. More info can be found at: tcorganizer.com

Minneapolis bar & brewery Harriet Brewing has announced they will be hosting a fundraising event for Sisters’ Camelot on Monday, June 23rd.

Please call Harriet Brewing several times a day, every day this week with the following message:

“Harriet Brewing is hosting a fundraising event for union-busting organization Sisters’ Camelot on Monday, June 23rd. Sisters Camelots’ fundraisers are still on strike and there is currently a full boycott of Sisters’ Camelot that has been endorsed by five prominent local unions. Please publicly cancel the event and notify the striking workers union at twincities@iww.org.”

Here’s the phone number:

General phone: 612-315-4633

(call this number and ask to speak to a manager or whomever is in charge.

Call several times per day. Leave messages if you don’t get through. Call every day this week!

Their hours are:
Tuesday: 4:00-11:00 pm
Wednesday: 4:00-11:00 pm
Thursday: 4:00-12:00 am
Friday: 4:00-12:00 am
Saturday: 1:00-12:00 am

POSTPONED: Junior Wobblies Yard Sale!

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Come support the Junior Wobblies summer camp and pick up some great yard sale treasures. All proceeds go to programming for a summer camp & education program for working class kids & families held annually in the Iron Range of Minnesota.

770 Hamline Ave N, St Paul, MN
Saturday, June 6, 2014
3PM-6PM

 

DUE TO CRUMMY WEATHER, THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED. NEW DATE TO BE ANNOUNCED.

Twin Cities union locals endorse Sisters Camelot boycott

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In response to the Twin Cities IWW call for a boycott of Sisters Camelot, the following union locals have passed resolutions supporting us.

AFSCME Local 34

AFSCME Local 34 Endorses Total Boycott of Sisters’ Camelot, in response to last Sunday’s anti-worker violence. Thanks to our Fellow Workers for their solidarity!

The passed resolution:

Whereas, the canvassers who raise the vast majority of funds for Sisters’ Camelot, a local non-profit, have been on strike for 15 months, affiliated with the Twin Cities Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), and,

Whereas, Sisters’ Camelot refused to negotiate in good faith soon after the canvassers announced their formation of a union and requested bargaining, and,

Whereas, Sisters’ Camelot fired a canvasser and waged a campaign to smear him, in retaliation for the formation of a union, and,

Whereas, Sisters’ Camelot has been working with John Hauge, an anti-worker, union-busting attorney who has openly boasted in the media of helping employers escape accountability for sexual harassment and workplace deaths, and,

Whereas, at the annual In the Heart of the Beast festival celebrating Mayday, a day celebrated internationally in remembrance of the brave struggle for the 8-hour day, Sisters’ Camelot and their supporters coordinated an escalating attempt to break a peaceful picket of their operations, and,

Whereas, numerous members of the Twin Cities IWW were physically assaulted as part of this attack on workers’ rights, including one member tackled to the ground and left with numerous physical injuries, and,

Whereas, all workers have the right to engage in free speech in order to seek the redress of their grievances, and,

Whereas, the Twin Cities IWW has called for “a complete economic, organizational, and charitable boycott of Sisters’ Camelot”, and,

WHEREAS, AN INJURY TO ONE IS AN INJURY TO ALL!;

Therefore,

Be it resolved, AFSCME Local 34 endorses the call for a complete economic, organizational, and charitable boycott of Sisters’ Camelot, and further,

Resolved, AFSCME Local 34 will participate in the boycott by not giving space, financial contributions, or other aid to Sisters’ Camelot, nor engage them for any services, and further,

Resolved, AFSCME Local 34 encourages all members to participate in the boycott on an individual level, and further,
Resolved, AFSCME Local 34 encourages all of its ally organizations in the labor and activist communities to refuse to provide any aid to Sisters’ Camelot, nor engage Sisters’ Camelot for any services.

Teamsters Local 638

Teamsters Local 638 has just passed the following resolution regarding the Sisters’ Camelot Canvass Union:

The workers of the Sisters Camelot Canvassers Union, affiliated with the Twin Cities IWW, have been on strike for 15 months due to their employers refusing to negotiate with them in good faith.

In response to the union drive at their organization, the management of Sisters’ Camelot engaged in typical union-busting behavior, firing a canvasser and employing the services of a union­-busting lawyer.

Recently, when confronted with a peaceful picket, Sisters’ Camelot and their supporters responded with attempts to break the picket with physical violence. During this, multiple members of the Twin Cities IWW, as well as members of IBT Local 638, were physically assaulted, including one IWW picketer tackled to the ground and left with numerous physical injuries.

We recognize that the labor movement is strongest when union members stand in solidarity with one another. Any such assault on a picket line is an insult and affront to the entire labor movement, and to all workers who seek to improve their conditions at work.

Whereas, the Twin Cities IWW has called for “a complete economic, organizational, and charitable boycott of Sisters’ Camelot”,

THEREFORE,

IBT Local 638 condemns the shameful behavior of Sisters Camelot and endorses the call for a complete boycott of its activities until all issues with its union workers are resolved, and encourages all members to participate in the boycott on an individual level.

CWA Local 7250

At [the Wednesday, May 14] general membership meeting of Minneapolis-based Communications Workers of America Local 7250 the following motion was passed unanimously:

“CWA 7250 condemns the anti-union behavior of the Sisters Camelot operation and supports a total boycott of its activities until all issues with its union workers are resolved.”

May 14, 2014

AFSCME 3800

AFSCME 3800 Endorses IWW Workers, Condemns Sisters Camelot Collective’s Union Busting:

Resolution in support of Sisters Camelot Strike

Whereas, the canvassers who raise the vast majority of funds for Sisters’ Camelot, a local non-profit, have been on strike for 15 months, affiliated with the Twin Cities Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), and,

Whereas, Sisters’ Camelot refused to negotiate in good faith soon after the canvassers announced their formation of a union and requested bargaining,

Whereas, Sisters’ Camelot fired a canvasser and waged a campaign to smear him, in retaliation for the formation of a union, and,

Whereas, Sisters’ Camelot has been working with John Hauge, an anti-worker, union-busting attorney who has openly boasted in the media of helping employers escape accountability for sexual harassment and workplace deaths, and,

Whereas, at the annual In the Heart of the Beast festival celebrating Mayday, a day celebrated internationally in remembrance of the brave struggle for the 8-hour day, Sisters’ Camelot and their supporters coordinated an escalating attempt to break a peaceful picket of their operations, and,

Whereas, numerous members of the Twin Cities IWW were physically assaulted as part of this attack on workers’ rights, including one member tackled to the ground and left with numerous physical injuries, and,

Whereas, all workers have the right to engage in free speech in order to seek the redress of their grievances, and,

Whereas, the Twin Cities IWW has called for “a complete economic, organizational, and charitable boycott of Sisters’ Camelot”, and,

Whereas, AN INJURY TO ONE IS AN INJURY TO ALL!;

Therefore, Be it resolved, AFSCME Local 3800 endorses the call for a complete economic, organizational, and charitable boycott of Sisters’ Camelot, and further,

Resolved, AFSCME Local 3800 will participate in the boycott by not giving space, financial contributions, or other aid to Sisters’ Camelot, nor engage them for any services, and further,

Resolved, AFSCME Local 3800 encourages all members to participate in the boycott on an individual level, and further,

Resolved, AFSCME Local 3800 encourages all of its ally organizations in the labor and activist communities to refuse to provide any aid to Sisters’ Camelot, nor engage Sisters’ Camelot for any services.

Passed by the AFSCME 3800 membership

May 22, 2014

Think of the children: fraud and Minnesota charter schools

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From Classroom Struggle TC

Earlier this month, a report put out by The Center for Popular Democracy and the Integrity in Education project found that since charter schools first appeared in the early 1990s, they have been responsible for costing taxpayers $100 million in fraud, abuse, and waste.

In the introduction of the nearly 50-page document, the authors list three prototypical examples of the type of fraud the report focuses on, two of which are taken from Minnesota charter schools.   In one of the noted cases, quoting from the official Federal Department of Education website:

“The former owners of one of the first charter schools in Minnesota were sentenced today in United States District Court for defrauding the school to help subsidize an extravagant lifestyle. William Pierce, age 46, was sentenced to 37 months in federal prison and three years of supervised release. His wife, Shirley Pierce, also 46 years of age, was sentenced to 30 months in prison and three years of supervised release. In addition, Judge Michael J. Davis ordered the couple to pay $489,239.65 in restitution to the Minnesota Department of Education, which, along with the federal government, funded the school.”

The report mentioned another fraud case from Minnesota, in which local Fox 9 News found that “Joel Pourier, 40, of Shakopee pled guilty to eight felony counts of theft by swindle. Pourier had worked as the financial director and executive director at Oh Day Aki Heart of the Earth Charter School between 2002 and July 2008.” Bank transactions indicate he had “embezzled over $1,380,000 from August 2003 through July 2008.”

In another instance of local charter school fraud Eric Mahmoud, who runs the Harvest Prep and Best charter schools, is implicated in a variety of violations, including using his school’s letterhead in asking for gross overpayment in a real-estate deal, paying employees as contractors instead of employees, and frequent unclear payments between himself and his publicly-funded organizations.

Charter schools distinguish themselves by not being held to the same standards and oversights required of public schools. Financially, this allows for-profit charter schools to take public money and for non-profit charter schools to oversee their own finances.

It’s worth speculating about the possible connection between, on the one hand, Minnesota’s special status as both where the charter school movement got its start and its #1 ranking as the best state for charter schools in the country and, on the other hand, Minnesota’s disproportionate number of high-profile cases of charter school fraud.

We at Classroom Struggle are deeply critical of the top-down authority structures and the all too common lack of meaningful community control within public education. However, charter schools’ further eschewing of accountability mechanisms has lead directly to corporate executives who run charter schools misappropriating large sums of money for personal gain. What would an education system look like in which the refrain “think of the children” inspired us to empower kids instead of making it easier to steal from them?

Short update FAQ on the Sisters Camelot struggle

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From Sisters Camelot Canvass Union

The Sisters Camelot Canvass Union (SCCU) of the IWW has released many statements and documents explaining their position on the conflict between the union and their managers, the Sisters Camelot Collective.

We encourage anyone interested in learning actual details to read these statements and documents at http://canvassunion.org/

However, as a result of the violent and apparently coordinated attack on a picket of the Sisters Camelot Bus, many similar questions have been raised again. While an attack on a picket defending worker rights at May Day – a holiday commemorating the struggles by immigrant workers in Chicago to obtain the 8-hour day – is appalling, we continue to receive questions and offers for intervention, indicating that either people are no longer reading our old FAQ document (http://canvassunion.org/2013/03/02/faq/), or that it may need to be updated.

Nothing in the following is intended to contradict any of the points on the SCCU page. The following points are entirely supplementary to those documents.

1. What’s the problem at Sisters’ Camelot?

Canvass Union workers self-organized against unfair working conditions, and for workplace democracy [improved pay was actually secondary] at Sisters Camelot. The workers approached the Twin Cities IWW, asking to join the union and become a campaign within the IWW. The IWW welcomed them, as we do any group of self-organized workers.The response of the Collective was to fire one worker and refuse any negotiations about the workers’ demands. The Collective then engaged in a vicious and protracted union-busting and smear campaign.

From the beginning to today, the Canvass Workers are waiting to hear whether the Collective has changed its mind and is willing to negotiate with organized workers.

2. Why pick on Sisters’ Camelot? Isn’t a non-profit that feeds hungry people on our side? Why not go organize at McDonald’s?

We’ve heard this one a lot. Nobody is ‘picking’ on Sisters Camelot. The canvassers endured sub-minimum wages while providing 95% of the operating budget of the operation. They were denied autonomy over their working conditions by their bosses, the Collective. They self-organized to improve those conditions, and later approached the IWW.

Workers everywhere, in all industries, in all locations, regardless of size, activity, industry, or ‘good intentions’ of their employers, have a right to organize. To imagine that some sectors should be protected from union organizing is a hard right-wing notion.

The vast majority of our campaigns have been against large and medium-sized capitalists. Nevertheless, the IWW is a union for all workers. The Sisters Camelot collective has acted identically to these large capitalist employers in the ways they have attempted to bust our union, from the nasty lawyers they use to the physical violence they coordinate and encourage. See here for more: http://goo.gl/UMBYFi

Workers at Sisters’ Camelot were actually organizing partly in order to improve the work of Sisters’ Camelot, which for some time now has been operating more like the private hobby of a few on the collective, instead of a reliable and socially useful program.

3. Are the workers willing to negotiate?

A constant smear of the workers is that they are unwilling to negotiate. This is untrue. The workers have insisted on their openness to negotiation since the beginning; the collective has never once agreed to negotiation or mediation. We are still waiting.

This is why new offers to mediate between the IWW and the Collective seem strange to us. We have always been willing to negotiate. The collective never has been. If people want negotiation or mediation to proceed, they should direct their efforts toward convincing the Collective members.

4. What right did the IWW have to picket the Sisters’ Camelot Bus at the Powderhorn Park May Day event?

Every right. Anytime an operation is struck, it is subject to a picket or strike action anytime and anywhere it attempts to continue normal operations. Sisters Camelot was not present in 2013. We approached Paul Robinson, HOBT May Day Coordinator, who assured us that “Sisters’ Camelot and HOBT have come to a mutual agreement again this year that the bus will not be in Powderhorn Park.”

On seeing the Sisters’ Camelot bus, a few workers organized a peaceful picket, and were immediately and aggressively harassed, by people pretending to not see them and go ‘through’ them, to verbal harassment. A few of the Sisters’ Collective major supporters – people not in the collective, but providing most of the energy in the campaign to destroy the workers – showed up and got on their phones. Shortly after, a large crowd of drunk and aggressive supporters of Sisters’ Camelot arrived, and began violently attacking the picket.

Some used children in strollers to push into the picketers, others held hands and danced between the picketers, physically entangling them. Finally, one picketers was harassed and grabbed and thrown off-balance, and put an attacker into a headlock as he fell. He went down and was attacked by several people, leaving him with cuts and abrasions to his face. The entire time, misogynistic, homophobic, and anti-working class language was the staple of the attackers. Anti-woman and queer slurs were constant, as were sneers that some of us may have to work for a living, or have the desire to improve the conditions of our work.

5. Isn’t this hurting the radical/liberal/leftist/activist community in (South) Minneapolis?

No. We feel the same pain that others feel when our relationships are strained, when we have arguments with friends or acquaintances, and when people we considered friends turn on us. This is not the same thing as ‘hurting our community.’ Instead, what we are experiencing is honesty, and clarification. It can be painful, but we hope that we can emerge from this conflict with a genuine community that stands behind a wide variety of important social causes, without sacrificing any of them to the others. Throwing workers under the bus is never okay.

Charter schools of the Twin Cities: by the numbers

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From Classroom Struggle TC

Here at Classroom Struggle, we take a critical view of the charter school approach to improving the quality of K-12 education. While the larger arguments about what kind of education system we want and why our current one is flawed are important, it’s crucial first to have a grasp of the numbers.

In what will be an ongoing effort on this blog, we’re going to collect important statistics on charter schools in the Twin Cities and in Minnesota because much of this information is scattered and difficult to find. We believe that the numbers lend themselves to deep critiques—we’ll get to these in future posts—of the charter school movement, but for now take a look at the data for yourself:

 


  • [Note: All data is from the most recent statistics, and as some data isn't collected annually or is slow to be released, latest statistics might be from before 2013.]
  • Since 2010, the Walton Family Foundation, set up and overseen by the founders of Walmart, have given $1.72 million directly to charter schools in the Twin Cities (this does not include other funding, which is thought to be significant, to local pro-charter school advocacy groups and think tanks). (Source: Charter School Partners)
  • 18% of Twin Cities district schools students are designated having ‘special needs’. 12% of Twin Cities charter schools students are designated having ‘special needs’. (Source: TC Daily Planet)
  • Charter schools are increasingly more segregated by race than district schools. The number of black students in predominantly black schools has risen to 88% for charter schools and declining to 44% in district schools, and the respective statistics for white students are 73% and 51%, for Hispanic students are 76% and 38%, for Native American students 54% and 38%, and for Asian students 82% and 38%. (Source: Institute for Metropolitan Opportunity at the University of Minnesota (pg. 6))

We hope to continue to add to this to create a public database of easy-to-find, accurate information about charter schools in our communities. If you know of good sources of information for Minnesota charter schools, please post them below!

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