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Posts from the ‘Organizing’ Category

IWW Picket of Harriet Brewing and Tap Room

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Harriet Brewing and Tap Room is holding a SCAB FUNDRAISER for Sisters Camelot, a business that the IWW has been striking for over a year, through the self-organized Sisters Camelot Canvass Union (SCCU).

Sisters Camelot fired one of these workers on th the IWW on March 4th, 2013. Since then, the workers have been on strike. The National Labor Relations Board has consistently ruled in favor of the striking workers, and Sisters Camelot responded with ever-more-embarrassing tactics: allowing a notoriously misogynistic union-busting lawyer, John Hauge, to represent them pro bono, and even encouraging an attack on IWW members on May Day (of all days, they attack us on a day memorializing the fight for the 8-hour day!).

The IWW has called for a Complete Boycott.

The following unions have signed solidarity statements and pledged to encourage and enforce the boycott: AFSCME 34, AFSCME 3800, CWA 7250, and TEAMSTERS 638. The Twin Cities General Defense Committee has also condemned the Sisters Camelot Collective and thrown their full solidarity to the striking workers.

These striking workers have endured over a year of precarious existence, living with extremely few means, all as a result of the Sisters Camelot collective and their allies engaging in classic capitalist union busting techniques.

These workers provided approximately 95% of the Sisters Camelot funding base, as canvassers. They are on strike. Supporting a fundraiser is SCAB WORK.

The IWW has always enjoyed the Harriet Brewing Tap Room. Immediately across from our office, we have supported it and been customers since day one.

We assumed that this error was merely that – an error made without knowledge and in good faith. We assumed that after we reached out to the manager and owner and explained the situation, they would cancel the event.

But for the past two weeks, through emails, documents dropped off at the tap room, and many many phone calls, the management of the Tap Room has refused to respond.

 

We went in one last time on Thursday, and explained that if they did not cancel the fundraiser, we would picket, and that this picket would hurt their business. This is, after all, the intent of any picket. We told them we didn’t want this to happen, especially to the workers at the brewery, but that we have to look out for our Fellow Workers in the union first and foremost. We practically begged them to cancel this event.

But they haven’t.

So on SATURDAY, JUNE 21st, WE WILL GATHER AS MANY WORKERS AND SUPPORTERS AS WE CAN AND PICKET THEIR PAID EVENT, BEGINNING AT 6 PM.

Show up at 5:30 on the sidewalk across the street from the brewery! Show your support for independent worker-directed unions! Show your refusal to allow scabs and bosses to rule our world!

And yes – this is going to be FUN. Bring your party mindset.

Time:5:30 PM, Saturday, June 21 2014

Place: 3036 Minnehaha Ave Minneapolis, MN 55406

Phone Blast Harriet Brewing!

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Sisters’ Camelot is a union-busting organization whose fundraising workers have been on strike since March 1, 2013 and have endured a long and brutal union-busting campaign by their bosses.

On May 4th a peaceful picket of the Sisters’ Camelot Kitchenbus was violently attacked by supporters of the union-busters at the May Day Festival. In response the Twin Cities IWW announced a complete boycott of Sisters’ Camelot whose canvass workers are still on strike. This boycott was endorsed by AFSCME Local 3800, AFSCME Local 34, Teamster Local 638, CWA Local 7250. More info can be found at: tcorganizer.com

Minneapolis bar & brewery Harriet Brewing has announced they will be hosting a fundraising event for Sisters’ Camelot on Monday, June 23rd.

Please call Harriet Brewing several times a day, every day this week with the following message:

“Harriet Brewing is hosting a fundraising event for union-busting organization Sisters’ Camelot on Monday, June 23rd. Sisters Camelots’ fundraisers are still on strike and there is currently a full boycott of Sisters’ Camelot that has been endorsed by five prominent local unions. Please publicly cancel the event and notify the striking workers union at twincities@iww.org.”

Here’s the phone number:

General phone: 612-315-4633

(call this number and ask to speak to a manager or whomever is in charge.

Call several times per day. Leave messages if you don’t get through. Call every day this week!

Their hours are:
Tuesday: 4:00-11:00 pm
Wednesday: 4:00-11:00 pm
Thursday: 4:00-12:00 am
Friday: 4:00-12:00 am
Saturday: 1:00-12:00 am

Twin Cities union locals endorse Sisters Camelot boycott

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In response to the Twin Cities IWW call for a boycott of Sisters Camelot, the following union locals have passed resolutions supporting us.

AFSCME Local 34

AFSCME Local 34 Endorses Total Boycott of Sisters’ Camelot, in response to last Sunday’s anti-worker violence. Thanks to our Fellow Workers for their solidarity!

The passed resolution:

Whereas, the canvassers who raise the vast majority of funds for Sisters’ Camelot, a local non-profit, have been on strike for 15 months, affiliated with the Twin Cities Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), and,

Whereas, Sisters’ Camelot refused to negotiate in good faith soon after the canvassers announced their formation of a union and requested bargaining, and,

Whereas, Sisters’ Camelot fired a canvasser and waged a campaign to smear him, in retaliation for the formation of a union, and,

Whereas, Sisters’ Camelot has been working with John Hauge, an anti-worker, union-busting attorney who has openly boasted in the media of helping employers escape accountability for sexual harassment and workplace deaths, and,

Whereas, at the annual In the Heart of the Beast festival celebrating Mayday, a day celebrated internationally in remembrance of the brave struggle for the 8-hour day, Sisters’ Camelot and their supporters coordinated an escalating attempt to break a peaceful picket of their operations, and,

Whereas, numerous members of the Twin Cities IWW were physically assaulted as part of this attack on workers’ rights, including one member tackled to the ground and left with numerous physical injuries, and,

Whereas, all workers have the right to engage in free speech in order to seek the redress of their grievances, and,

Whereas, the Twin Cities IWW has called for “a complete economic, organizational, and charitable boycott of Sisters’ Camelot”, and,

WHEREAS, AN INJURY TO ONE IS AN INJURY TO ALL!;

Therefore,

Be it resolved, AFSCME Local 34 endorses the call for a complete economic, organizational, and charitable boycott of Sisters’ Camelot, and further,

Resolved, AFSCME Local 34 will participate in the boycott by not giving space, financial contributions, or other aid to Sisters’ Camelot, nor engage them for any services, and further,

Resolved, AFSCME Local 34 encourages all members to participate in the boycott on an individual level, and further,
Resolved, AFSCME Local 34 encourages all of its ally organizations in the labor and activist communities to refuse to provide any aid to Sisters’ Camelot, nor engage Sisters’ Camelot for any services.

Teamsters Local 638

Teamsters Local 638 has just passed the following resolution regarding the Sisters’ Camelot Canvass Union:

The workers of the Sisters Camelot Canvassers Union, affiliated with the Twin Cities IWW, have been on strike for 15 months due to their employers refusing to negotiate with them in good faith.

In response to the union drive at their organization, the management of Sisters’ Camelot engaged in typical union-busting behavior, firing a canvasser and employing the services of a union­-busting lawyer.

Recently, when confronted with a peaceful picket, Sisters’ Camelot and their supporters responded with attempts to break the picket with physical violence. During this, multiple members of the Twin Cities IWW, as well as members of IBT Local 638, were physically assaulted, including one IWW picketer tackled to the ground and left with numerous physical injuries.

We recognize that the labor movement is strongest when union members stand in solidarity with one another. Any such assault on a picket line is an insult and affront to the entire labor movement, and to all workers who seek to improve their conditions at work.

Whereas, the Twin Cities IWW has called for “a complete economic, organizational, and charitable boycott of Sisters’ Camelot”,

THEREFORE,

IBT Local 638 condemns the shameful behavior of Sisters Camelot and endorses the call for a complete boycott of its activities until all issues with its union workers are resolved, and encourages all members to participate in the boycott on an individual level.

CWA Local 7250

At [the Wednesday, May 14] general membership meeting of Minneapolis-based Communications Workers of America Local 7250 the following motion was passed unanimously:

“CWA 7250 condemns the anti-union behavior of the Sisters Camelot operation and supports a total boycott of its activities until all issues with its union workers are resolved.”

May 14, 2014

AFSCME 3800

AFSCME 3800 Endorses IWW Workers, Condemns Sisters Camelot Collective’s Union Busting:

Resolution in support of Sisters Camelot Strike

Whereas, the canvassers who raise the vast majority of funds for Sisters’ Camelot, a local non-profit, have been on strike for 15 months, affiliated with the Twin Cities Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), and,

Whereas, Sisters’ Camelot refused to negotiate in good faith soon after the canvassers announced their formation of a union and requested bargaining,

Whereas, Sisters’ Camelot fired a canvasser and waged a campaign to smear him, in retaliation for the formation of a union, and,

Whereas, Sisters’ Camelot has been working with John Hauge, an anti-worker, union-busting attorney who has openly boasted in the media of helping employers escape accountability for sexual harassment and workplace deaths, and,

Whereas, at the annual In the Heart of the Beast festival celebrating Mayday, a day celebrated internationally in remembrance of the brave struggle for the 8-hour day, Sisters’ Camelot and their supporters coordinated an escalating attempt to break a peaceful picket of their operations, and,

Whereas, numerous members of the Twin Cities IWW were physically assaulted as part of this attack on workers’ rights, including one member tackled to the ground and left with numerous physical injuries, and,

Whereas, all workers have the right to engage in free speech in order to seek the redress of their grievances, and,

Whereas, the Twin Cities IWW has called for “a complete economic, organizational, and charitable boycott of Sisters’ Camelot”, and,

Whereas, AN INJURY TO ONE IS AN INJURY TO ALL!;

Therefore, Be it resolved, AFSCME Local 3800 endorses the call for a complete economic, organizational, and charitable boycott of Sisters’ Camelot, and further,

Resolved, AFSCME Local 3800 will participate in the boycott by not giving space, financial contributions, or other aid to Sisters’ Camelot, nor engage them for any services, and further,

Resolved, AFSCME Local 3800 encourages all members to participate in the boycott on an individual level, and further,

Resolved, AFSCME Local 3800 encourages all of its ally organizations in the labor and activist communities to refuse to provide any aid to Sisters’ Camelot, nor engage Sisters’ Camelot for any services.

Passed by the AFSCME 3800 membership

May 22, 2014

Short update FAQ on the Sisters Camelot struggle

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From Sisters Camelot Canvass Union

The Sisters Camelot Canvass Union (SCCU) of the IWW has released many statements and documents explaining their position on the conflict between the union and their managers, the Sisters Camelot Collective.

We encourage anyone interested in learning actual details to read these statements and documents at http://canvassunion.org/

However, as a result of the violent and apparently coordinated attack on a picket of the Sisters Camelot Bus, many similar questions have been raised again. While an attack on a picket defending worker rights at May Day – a holiday commemorating the struggles by immigrant workers in Chicago to obtain the 8-hour day – is appalling, we continue to receive questions and offers for intervention, indicating that either people are no longer reading our old FAQ document (http://canvassunion.org/2013/03/02/faq/), or that it may need to be updated.

Nothing in the following is intended to contradict any of the points on the SCCU page. The following points are entirely supplementary to those documents.

1. What’s the problem at Sisters’ Camelot?

Canvass Union workers self-organized against unfair working conditions, and for workplace democracy [improved pay was actually secondary] at Sisters Camelot. The workers approached the Twin Cities IWW, asking to join the union and become a campaign within the IWW. The IWW welcomed them, as we do any group of self-organized workers.The response of the Collective was to fire one worker and refuse any negotiations about the workers’ demands. The Collective then engaged in a vicious and protracted union-busting and smear campaign.

From the beginning to today, the Canvass Workers are waiting to hear whether the Collective has changed its mind and is willing to negotiate with organized workers.

2. Why pick on Sisters’ Camelot? Isn’t a non-profit that feeds hungry people on our side? Why not go organize at McDonald’s?

We’ve heard this one a lot. Nobody is ‘picking’ on Sisters Camelot. The canvassers endured sub-minimum wages while providing 95% of the operating budget of the operation. They were denied autonomy over their working conditions by their bosses, the Collective. They self-organized to improve those conditions, and later approached the IWW.

Workers everywhere, in all industries, in all locations, regardless of size, activity, industry, or ‘good intentions’ of their employers, have a right to organize. To imagine that some sectors should be protected from union organizing is a hard right-wing notion.

The vast majority of our campaigns have been against large and medium-sized capitalists. Nevertheless, the IWW is a union for all workers. The Sisters Camelot collective has acted identically to these large capitalist employers in the ways they have attempted to bust our union, from the nasty lawyers they use to the physical violence they coordinate and encourage. See here for more: http://goo.gl/UMBYFi

Workers at Sisters’ Camelot were actually organizing partly in order to improve the work of Sisters’ Camelot, which for some time now has been operating more like the private hobby of a few on the collective, instead of a reliable and socially useful program.

3. Are the workers willing to negotiate?

A constant smear of the workers is that they are unwilling to negotiate. This is untrue. The workers have insisted on their openness to negotiation since the beginning; the collective has never once agreed to negotiation or mediation. We are still waiting.

This is why new offers to mediate between the IWW and the Collective seem strange to us. We have always been willing to negotiate. The collective never has been. If people want negotiation or mediation to proceed, they should direct their efforts toward convincing the Collective members.

4. What right did the IWW have to picket the Sisters’ Camelot Bus at the Powderhorn Park May Day event?

Every right. Anytime an operation is struck, it is subject to a picket or strike action anytime and anywhere it attempts to continue normal operations. Sisters Camelot was not present in 2013. We approached Paul Robinson, HOBT May Day Coordinator, who assured us that “Sisters’ Camelot and HOBT have come to a mutual agreement again this year that the bus will not be in Powderhorn Park.”

On seeing the Sisters’ Camelot bus, a few workers organized a peaceful picket, and were immediately and aggressively harassed, by people pretending to not see them and go ‘through’ them, to verbal harassment. A few of the Sisters’ Collective major supporters – people not in the collective, but providing most of the energy in the campaign to destroy the workers – showed up and got on their phones. Shortly after, a large crowd of drunk and aggressive supporters of Sisters’ Camelot arrived, and began violently attacking the picket.

Some used children in strollers to push into the picketers, others held hands and danced between the picketers, physically entangling them. Finally, one picketers was harassed and grabbed and thrown off-balance, and put an attacker into a headlock as he fell. He went down and was attacked by several people, leaving him with cuts and abrasions to his face. The entire time, misogynistic, homophobic, and anti-working class language was the staple of the attackers. Anti-woman and queer slurs were constant, as were sneers that some of us may have to work for a living, or have the desire to improve the conditions of our work.

5. Isn’t this hurting the radical/liberal/leftist/activist community in (South) Minneapolis?

No. We feel the same pain that others feel when our relationships are strained, when we have arguments with friends or acquaintances, and when people we considered friends turn on us. This is not the same thing as ‘hurting our community.’ Instead, what we are experiencing is honesty, and clarification. It can be painful, but we hope that we can emerge from this conflict with a genuine community that stands behind a wide variety of important social causes, without sacrificing any of them to the others. Throwing workers under the bus is never okay.

Picket violently attacked — call for full boycott of Sisters’ Camelot!

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On May 4th 2014, members of the Twin Cities IWW and supporters withstood a violent and deliberate attack on a picket of Sisters’ Camelot, whose canvass workers went onstrike in March of 2013 and have endured vicious union-busting efforts from the organization ever since. After some twenty minutes of peaceful picketing, Sisters’ Camelot supporters organized an escalating series of attacks and attempts to break the picket line, eventually tackling an IWW member to the ground and beating him until other Wobblies pulled them away.

Earlier in 2014, a committee organizing the 80th anniversary of the 1934 Minneapolis Trucker’s Strike was asked to participate in the official Heart of the Beast Theatre May Day Parade. Many members of the committee, which includes many IWW members, were concerned about whether or not HOBT was working with a known union-busting firm. In April, a member of the Remember 1934 committee made a discreet inquiry to the artistic director of HOBT, and an assurance was made that by mutual agreement between HOBT and Sisters’ Camelot, Sisters’ would not be at the festival.

However, on Sunday, as marchers with the Remember 1934 committee arrived at the park, a union member and striking canvasser alerted us that the Sisters Camelot bus was parked on 35th St near 13th Ave, directly facing Powderhorn Park, where the festival was occurring. Acting in solidarity with the striking canvassers, a group of Wobblies and community allies began a peaceful picket on the sidewalk in front of the bus’s serving window.

Members of Sisters’ Camelot managed only disorganized attempts to disrupt the peaceful picket for the first twenty minutes, including trying to drown the picketers out, and screaming that the workers were greedy for trying to improve their working conditions. When that failed, they called in support–many of the same cadre who had been a part of drafting anti-union “community statements,” and acted as advisers to Sisters Camelot in their union-busting efforts–in order to, as one of these individuals later explicitly stated online, “Run [the IWW] out.”

In their efforts to achieve their stated goal of breaking a peaceful picket line, Sisters’ Camelot steadily escalated their violence against IWW members. First they physically blocked workers and their supporters–at one point a Sisters’ Camelot supporter physically pushed her small child into the picket line. IWW members responded by peacefully moving around individuals trying to block their way. Following this failure, attackers began shoving and physically attacking picketers. Each time, IWW members did their best to defend themselves and continue the picket line. Meanwhile Sisters’ Camelot supporters did nothing to intervene or remove those individuals, evidently happy to have them act as their goons and enforcers. Eventually, several members of this cadre organized a group of people to encircle the picket, take picket signs and personal material and destroy them, and forcefully prevent the picket from continuing. At this point, an IWW member was tackled to the ground, where he was scratched and beaten by a member of Sisters Camelot as well as several supporters. Once more, it was up to the IWW picketers and supporters to remove these individuals, while those who had mobilized the attack looked on approvingly.

Beyond the physical attack, there was a constant stream of classist, sexist, homophobic, and otherwise problematic language from the assailants. Following the final assault, a member of Sisters’ Camelot mocked and belittled the beaten IWW member and another openly queer IWW member with homophobic and sexist slurs, in full view and earshot of many of the self-described anti-oppression activists who said and did nothing. Others mocked IWW members for having to work for a living, while still others were given the same tired anti-union line of “If you don’t like your job, get a new one.” Meanwhile, two IWW members overheard an individual walk up saying, “I’m looking forward to bashing in some IWW skulls.”

None of this is particularly surprising: while Sisters Camelot and their allies claim to be anti-oppression, they have repeatedly shown throughout the last 15 months that they are more than willing to ally themselves with openly anti-worker, anti-woman, and anti-queer individuals and institutions in order to get their way. When Sisters’ Camelot was brought to court over the illegal firing of a canvasser for union activities, they employed the services of John C. Hauge, a lawyer who boasts of defending corporations against sexual assault cases, OSHA claims, wrongful death lawsuits, and aiding companies in “union avoidance” efforts, among other contemptible practices. Laughably, they have repeatedly decried “aggression” from their striking workers and the IWW.

While their self-created image of rebellious attitude and anti-oppressive culture is well groomed, what lies beneath the surface is a condescending disregard for the wellbeing of anyone beyond their social circle. At one point, picketers overheard a SC Collective member state “I’m proud to be a scab!” while other key supporters laughed about the IWW member who was bleeding from his head, saying, “well, maybe he just sucks at fighting.”

To be perfectly clear, anyone who mobilizes their friends to assault a peaceful picket of workers and their supporters, who associates themselves with homophobes and sexists and then disclaims any responsibility for their actions, or who supports this type of activity, has no right to consider themselves a part of any progressive or radical community. To even consider otherwise is a slap in the face to everyone who fights for a better world.

We don’t take organized assaults on our members and friends lightly. After the assault on our picket line, we feel it is necessary to take further action against Sisters Camelot. The Twin Cities IWW calls for a complete economic, organizational, and charitable boycott of Sisters Camelot. If a scab canvasser comes to your door, turn them away empty handed. If they approach you about hosting a food share, tell them they are not welcome. Any individuals or organizations who continue to support Sisters Camelot will be associated with their shameful actions. There is no space within our communities for any organization that operates in this way.

We Never Sleep. We Never Forget.

Beyond “F*ck You”: An organizer’s approach to confronting hateful language at work.

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Most likely many of us have had to deal with hateful language and sentiments at our jobs. Here is an account about an organizer’s response at their workplace.

Read more

Scabs at Your Door

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From Sisters Camelot Canvass Union

Members of the Sisters’ Camelot Canvass Union (SCCU) have been informed by people in the Seward and Powderhorn neighborhoods of Minneapolis that scab canvassers from Sisters’ Camelot are soliciting donations at their doors. Please do not believe the lies of these scabs, and please do not give them any of your money. Regardless of what they say, the SCCU is still on strike with the full support of our union, the Industrial Workers of the World. Keep in mind that Sisters’ Camelot is a union-busting organization who has repeatedly demonstrated their willingness to lie and deceive in order to get their way. If you have come across any questions or concerns, please contact us at SistersCamelotCanvassUnion[at]gmail[dot]com. Thank you!

Workload & teacher power: reflections on an organizing victory at my school this year

workload-overload-w6272From Classroom Struggle TC

Here is a repost from the blog of the Education Organizing Committee of the Twin Cities IWW.

Do teachers and other educators have power to change things in our schools? Everyday I talk to teachers who are upset, saddened by negative changes, struggling to ensure all of their students succeed. Many days I ask my co-workers what we can do, or if they can help with something. Sometimes they say yes, but mostly they say they are too busy to do anything. Sometimes I feel like we are too busy drowning to organize a raft to save ourselves.

Yet over the last few months I had an experience at my Twin Cities school that has inspired me to rethink this issue. In my school, like many others, teachers are terrified of losing their jobs. Many of our students are not getting what they need and consequently the District is breathing down our neck, and pushing more initiatives than the principals can keep track of, much less implement in a way that will benefit our kids. We gain a sea of mostly useless meetings, professional development, professional learning communities and new lingo, all while having less time with our kids. My older co-workers have seen this again and again. Quick fixes instead of building trust and collaboration. No wonder many of them switch schools or take early retirement packages.

But this year was going to be different, because we were going to start acting like a union. A group of three teachers and support staff, some of them stewards, decided to start a series of conversations in the building about what people were experiencing. We decided that the atmosphere of the school was the issue on people’s lips and that we should create a space to discuss issues and find solutions.

We held discussions around the building in teacher’s classrooms and had surveys that we sent around and distributed at union meetings. In total, nearly 60 staff participated. We compiled the results creating a compelling record of how much we all care, and the day to day issues we are facing. We then went through and identified common themes. At the core of it, staff at our building were concerned about workload, being involved in decision-making, and racial justice.

We had a follow up meeting where about a dozen staff came in the busy time of December to propose specific solutions. Most of the specific solutions were about workload. Staff also wanted to have meaningful input in important decisions and there was some discussion and ideas for furthering racial justice. Race is a conversation I want to talk more about with my co-workers more.

That said, the tenured teachers among us took our solutions to Administration where they basically didn’t get anything, with a few concessions here and there. Our main concerns were about having too many meetings, but barely any time to meet as a grade level team to actually collaborate and work together. Instead school staff were pushed into mandatory committee meetings to address content entirely dictated by the administration, where the work that was done felt useless and unmotivating. We sent the proposal we brought to Administration to our co-workers along with the Administration’s responses, and called a meeting to see what people would think and want to do.

People had lots to say, yet felt afraid of doing more. Our goals seemed important but beyond the realm of the achievable. We would need to both solidify and broaden our group of organizers to include educators from every grade and job class in order to break through the culture of fear and into a place where we could get the word out, push issues and policies, and partner with parents around common goals…

Then in the midst of these conversations circulating around the building and the mess from snow days and conference rescheduling piling up, we got a break. More than a break—a victory. Mandatory professional development and professional learning community meetings had been canceled until after spring break. For at least six weeks we’d be free from these nice sounding, but totally ineffective meetings. Meetings that are a huge waste of time because they are imposed on, rather than grow out of teacher’s work of educating their students and collaborating organically to help each other. What had previously seemed impossible and beyond our courage to organize for, had now (temporarily) been achieved.

I hope this will help my co-workers better understand their power. If we organize we can take back our time so our kids get the education they deserve, and so we don’t burn out under a pile of paper. I know my co-workers see the writing on the wall, that if we can do better—sadly through the strange prism of test scores—this change has the possibility of being permanent.

I hope we continue to grow our group to really be organized, to really build with parents, students, and the community, to use the time we gain to refocus on the other issues of racial justice and decision-making that are central to improving our schools. I hope more of us get serious about getting the skills we need to organize effectively, which I receive on a regular basis as part of the IWW Education Organizing Committee. Feel free to contact us to learn more or join us.

Because we can’t solve our problems by closing our classroom doors and hoping that someone else—the union? School board? President?—will solve our problems for us. And while we ultimately need to take over the schools and make them our system not a system that we live with, steps like these can be taken in every school, right now. And those of us doing this work can communicate with each other, learn, share, build. If this was happening at every school today, imagine how much more powerful we would be!

New blog from IWW Education Organizing Committee

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Go on over to Classroom Struggle and check out the Education Organizing Committee of the Twin Cities IWW’s new blog.

From the ‘About Us’ section:

Who We Are

This blog and the Twin Cities Annual Social Justice Education Fair are projects of the Twin Cities IWW Education Organizing Committee, a group of education organizers open to all K-12 public education workers. We strive to bring together educators, students, parents and caregivers, and communities from across the Twin Cities who believe that another  kind of education possible. We are working to identify and eliminate the ways schools perpetuate injustice, and seek to transform our education system on the principles of community self-determination and worker control, sustainability, freedom, and social justice.

Part of our goal then is to create a team of like-minded people dedicated to these values and to growing a powerful movement in education. Right now in our schools, we see two urgent and connected struggles:

  • One is for social justice in our schools, along the lines of race, gender & sexuality, colonialism, and capitalism.
  • Another is against further divestment, de-professionalization, standardization, and privatization.

Both are essential for the future of our schools, and only an authentic coalition of educators, students, parents, and community for racial and social justice and against ‘reform’ has the potential to transform our schools.

Our blog then, like the Social Justice Education Fair, is not only about identifying and better understanding the threats to the kinds of education we desire. It’s also about the actions and solutions small and large that we can make in our classrooms, schools and communities to build our power and make real change.

 

Deja Vu (Part 1 of 2): The Parallels Between the Sisters’ Camelot & Jimmy John’s Anti-Union Campaigns

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Part 1 of 2:

The Parallels Between the Sisters’ Camelot & Jimmy John’s Anti-Union Campaigns

By Robbie Jenson & Travis Elise

Travis & Robbie are members of the Jimmy John’s Workers Union and the Twin Cities General Membership Branch of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW).  In this article they discuss the similarities between the struggles at Jimmy John’s and Sisters’ Camelot.  In Part 2, they will debunk the community statement (A Letter of Support for all the Workers at Sisters’ Camelot) written and signed onto by several members of the south Minneapolis radical community.

On February 25th, 2013, the canvassers at Sister’s Camelot, a non-profit mobile food shelf and soup kitchen, announced to their managers that they had formed a union and were card-carrying members of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW).  Days later, the Sisters’ Camelot Canvass Union (SCCU) presented their bosses with their terms, attempting to begin negotiations.  Management refused, and the SCCU began a strike now lasting over 4 months.  During that time, the managers at Sisters’ Camelot, who make decisions collectively and handle different kinds of programming work themselves, have (along with their staunch supporters) launched a vicious anti-union campaign that has been surprising, confusing, and misleading to many. Interestingly, however, the collective’s union-busting strategies are disturbingly similar to the last public campaign of the Twin Cities IWW, which was at a local Jimmy John’s fast food franchise.  This in spite of the difference in mission, structure, and culture of the businesses.

As members of the IWW and the enduring Jimmy John’s Workers Union, we feel the need to identify these common strategies for busting unions and the ways they have been used by both Jimmy John’s and the collective at Sisters’ Camelot. Our hope is that this perspective will help clarify the present situation and encourage the collective and supporters of Sisters’ Camelot to recognize the SCCU as a positive force capable of improving the sustainability and integrity of the organization that our communities value so enormously.

At Jimmy John’s, workers organized under the radar, building the committee and taking action on the shop floor, from early 2007 until September 2010, when the Jimmy John’s Workers Union announced itself to management.  Shortly thereafter, we filed for a union certification election with the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) to force our bosses to negotiate with us.  During this period, our union experienced a barrage of union-busting tactics by the bosses and their paid anti-union consultants. Fortunately, the IWW has already consolidated decades of experience into organizer trainings that provide workers with an idea of what to expect from an anti-union drive, and it’s surprisingly consistent in any kind of shop. With the strike and subsequent anti-union efforts unfolding at Sisters’ Camelot, we recognized immediately the eerily similar actions and statements made by the collective and their supporters. After the retaliatory firing of one union canvasser, we both became alarmed and felt the urgent need to draw attention to these commonalities between the management team at our corporate franchise and the collective at this non-profit organization. We want to encourage our community members and others sympathetic to non-profit missions to analyse this struggle in terms of class, which has been something most have failed to do.  This can be challenging because of the emotional connections many in the community have to the organization, its mission, and to collectivism as a radical endeavor.  But the reality of the situation is clear: an organization cannot be anti-authoritarian when it defends its own stark hierarchies.

Here we have listed some of these common union-busting strategies, and below we discuss the ways in which they have been used both at Jimmy John’s and at Sisters’ Camelot. We were surprised and disappointed to hear them from the Sisters’ Camelot collective, but that only reaffirms their position as bosses and makes clear the need for the canvassers to stand strong as a union.

A few of the things bosses will say include:

  • “Unions have a place but not at our workplace.”

  • “This business is like a family and is different than most companies.”

  • “This is the first we have heard of your concerns. If we had known, we would have gladly made things better. You can use existing ways to engage with the business so we can fix problems by working together. We will do things to show our appreciation of you and make it easier for you to come to us.”

  • “We are workers, too. We have worked hard to build this business and deserve your respect. Your organizing is hurtful to us. We are victims of your organizing.”

  • “This union drive could cause the business to close. We simply can’t afford to have a union.”

  • “The IWW is an aggressive organization with scary politics that is using you to achieve its political agenda. They will harass you and trick you. We can protect you from them.”

  • “There is a certain individual that is causing problems for all of us. They are hostile, manipulative and disruptive, and they are destroying our relationship with you.  They have ulterior motives.  We will all be better off without them.”

    and finally…

  • The Dirty Truth: The Bosses Will Lie.

Unions have a place but not at our workplace.

We call this the “not in my backyard” excuse. Bosses will often attempt to legitimize their anti-union position by claiming that they have experience with unions or support unions for certain jobs or in certain kinds of workplaces. They explain to workers that a union is not appropriate at their workplace or that they don’t need one because they are different or because they have a unique opportunity to work together. Even our Jimmy John’s, a franchise of a corporation, claimed this by saying that it was a certain kind of work for a certain kind of people.

At Sisters’ Camelot, the managing collective has also stated they are not anti-union and that they wish to find an “alternative” solution to the labor strife in the organization, one which does not “jeopardize” their collective values.  They think they are somehow different or unique enough that a union is not needed.  Of course, Sisters’ Camelot and Jimmy John’s are different, but not in a way that means its workers should not organize themselves. In fact, based on its mission, Sisters’ Camelot should be more willing to negotiate in order to support social justice for workers. Failing to do so is hypocritical and defends hierarchies within the workplace.

Our bosses at Jimmy John’s said we weren’t a “real union,” and one manager even accused the union members of being a bunch of alcoholics too lazy to get real jobs.  Ironically enough, Rob Czernick, a supporter of the collective stated in a collective meeting that he supported “real workers and real unions, not a bunch of people who work a couple days a week for party money.”  When we heard this, we had a very eery feeling of deja vu.

In reality, unions are for all workers. In particular, the IWW doesn’t shy away from supporting workers in any job, including those who are in low-paying and precarious jobs like fast food or contracted positions. Every worker has the right to organize with other workers in order to improve their working conditions and to challenge power imbalances in the workplace, including the canvassers at Sisters’ Camelot.

This business is like a family and is different than most companies.

In many ways, Sisters’ Camelot is very different from most businesses. It is a non-profit organization, has a mission that uses direct action to support poor communities, and supports healthy living on a healthy planet. It is also managed by a collective who is deeply involved with and committed to certain kinds of work done by the organization. Of course, it is still a business and, like most other business, has bosses. Bosses control hiring and firing, determine the terms and conditions of work including pay, and control how the work is organized.

At Jimmy John’s, there is a hierarchy of bosses that includes assistant and general managers, area managers, owners, corporate auditors, and Jimmy himself.  Sisters’ Camelot operates differently, with its collective serving as a management team that makes decisions based on consensus. While this is applauded by many radicals for various reasons (and is a process we both value in certain circumstances), it doesn’t change the fact that the canvassers are excluded from the decision-making process entirely.  While canvassers can attend meetings and voice their opinions, they have no vote.  This puts them in an uncomfortable and vulnerable position that creates a power differential that operates just like the one we experience at Jimmy John’s, where we feel left out, ignored, and disrespected — not like a family.

This is the first we have heard of your concerns. If we had known, we would have gladly made things better. You can use existing ways to engage with the business so we can fix problems by working together. We will do things to show our appreciation of you and make it easier for you to come to us.

Many workers go to management with grievances when they first arise; we are conditioned to seek help from authority figures, whether they are parents, teachers, police officers, or bosses.  This is rarely ever effective in the workplace, however, because management is typically more removed from the grievance or because resolving it is simply not in their self-interest. This is frustrating and demoralizing for workers, especially those who genuinely care about their work.  It is more productive for workers to talk to management collectively or to implement solutions together through direct action. When workers realize that their problems are common problems based on shared experiences, they are able to assert their needs more strongly together.

In the past, canvass directors and canvassers for Sisters’ Camelot have unsuccessfully attempted to individually lobby the collective to improve the working conditions of the canvass without success, causing many canvassers and directors to leave on bad terms.  Even the simple fact that the canvass workers have to go to an authority with their ideas, needs and demands debunks the idea that Sisters’ Camelot is an organization based on worker control. In an organization that allegedly values social justice and direct action, the canvassers should be able to implement their ideas for improving their conditions and performance at work without seeking approval from anyone above them.

In an anti-union drive, bosses will always offer concessions that serve both as gestures to placate the workers and as mechanisms for challenging the power of the union by roping workers back into systems that are controlled by management. The solution proposed (and major concession made) by the bosses has been for canvassers to join the collective.  By offering them spots on the collective, they are individualizing the workers in an attempt to divide and conquer them.  One canvasser on the collective can easily become overpowered and demoralized while the other canvassers remain entirely disempowered.  The same thing occurred when Hardy Coleman, a former Canvass Director and then collective member attempted to implement changes identical to many of the demands presented by the canvassers to the collective.  It happened again when Bobby Becker was a member of the collective and became the sole advocate for the canvassers.  There’s no reason to believe things will be any different if a different canvasser or two were to become collective members.  At Jimmy John’s, bosses gave out raises and had one on one conversations with workers to try to legitimize their so-called “open door policy” and hinder the collective action of the workers.

The canvassers are in agreement about what they need in order to improve their work environment and do a better job.  They shouldn’t need to join another body of the organization in order to make changes related to their work. Additionally, they shouldn’t need to take on the responsibility of making decisions about other programs carried out by the organization if they don’t want to. Part of the problem in this situation is that workers within the organization have the power to make decisions about the entire organization while others have no decision-making power at all. It is the right of all workers to control their own work environment and processes, and no other group needs to do that for them.  Additionally, no worker should have to work unpaid time (a requirement for being part of the collective) to have a say on the job.

We are workers, too. We have worked hard to build this business and deserve your respect. Your organizing is hurtful to us. We are victims of your organizing.

In anti-union drives, bosses like to emphasize the fact that they also show up to work, contribute to the success of the business, or perhaps started it themselves. They like to play the victim card, insisting that workers’ organizing is uncalled-for, offensive, hurtful, and   disrespectful. In this way, management and/or owners try to frame the union drive as a personal matter and try to draw attention to themselves. They often say the organizing drive is unfair and that there are more appropriate ways to engage with the company in order to offer suggestions or express concerns. This argument also veils a threat: if you organize, you will betray me and I will make your life at work hellish. At Jimmy John’s, as with most businesses, preferential treatment is offered to workers who are in the good graces of management by being particularly reverent to authorities or doing personal favors. During the anti-union drive at Jimmy John’s, workers were generally mistreated, including being denied raises, because they declared union support while others were given promotions and raises for taking the side of the company.

Of course, the Sisters’ Camelot collective members do work and perform important functions for the organization’s operations and programs. This is not, however, about the collective, and no canvasser has spoken ill of work done in their programs. The issue at hand is simply that one group of workers has power over their own work and that of an entirely different group of workers, leaving the latter disenfranchised. To make this union out to be an attack on Sisters’ Camelot as an organization or the collective members as workers is classist and narrow-minded. It ignores workers who lack their own autonomy, and it indicates a defense of capitalist hierarchies. Denying any worker their basic right, alongside their Fellow Workers, to exert control over their own work by refusing to relinquish your power is, well– exactly what Jimmy John’s did. And it is done partly out of a love for control and authority, partly out of a distrust of the workforce that is fundamentally rooted in classism, and partly out of a desire to continue to control the flow of capital. This is painfully similar to the situation unfolding at Sisters’ Camelot.  The bosses at Sisters’ also don’t trust the workers nor do they show any indication of giving up any of their power.  The collective has explicitly stated they don’t trust the canvassers with things such as credit card information.  The collective has also said the structural changes would be “unhealthy” for Sisters’ Camelot and that there must “accountability” in place.  By accountability they obviously mean accountability to the collective.  To say the canvass should be accountable to the collective but not visa-versa is incredibly disrespectful and belittling.

The union drive could cause the business to close. We simply can’t afford to have a union.

Management will jump to the worst possible scenario in an anti-union drive. In many ways, this is meant to play on the fears of workers. It plays into the idea that workers should feel lucky to even have a job in an effort to undermine their dignity and their basic right to make a living and have control over their work. Sure, all businesses will be affected by some of the direct action tactics used by workers when they organize, including strikes, but this is a necessary part of forcing people in power to relinquish the power that does not belong to them. At Jimmy John’s, the company threatened to do away with bike delivery, claiming they would be unable to afford the insurance policy with the added cost of having a union. Similarly, the collective at Sisters’ Camelot threatened to replace the canvassers with volunteers.

When it comes to Sisters’ Camelot, this argument is simply ludicrous. Few of the canvassers’ demands are economic; most are structural and related to improving workplace democracy. The only two non-negotiable money-related demands are professional van maintenance and medical bills paid for work-related injuries. Professional van maintenance is a no-brainer.  Without a reliably functioning van, canvassers have had shortened and missed shifts.  Which, since the canvassers raise 95% of the organizations operating budget, this obviously affects the organization’s financial status.  And as far as medical bills go, it’s a basic worker’s right. All employees should be entitled to workers’ compensation for workplace injuries, and if Sisters’ Camelot refuses to accept this demand, they are worse than even the most sinister corporation by taking advantage of their contracted workers.

There are also negotiable demands that indisputably will increase productivity within the canvass operation such as accepting credit card donations at the door.  Other demands will improve the canvassers experiences at work and encourage them to do better work, like paid sick days and vacation, a 5% base pay raise, an extra bonus for working four shifts per week in addition to raising $500 per week, and access for the canvass coordinator to view online donations. All of these ideas would encourage canvassers to invest themselves more strongly in their work, which directly affects the income of the organization as a whole. The primary reason for opposing these demands is not financial; it is because of a lack of trust that, like Jimmy John’s, is a backward, classist, and selfish tendency that is keeping Sisters’ Camelot from truly realizing its alleged goal as a worker-controlled organization.

The last point related to money is simple: no demand costs an organization more than an anti-union drive.  The collective has attempted to paint the economic demands of the union as too costly to the organization.  This anti-union drive is costing Sisters’ Camelot far more money than they would incur by giving the workers a %5 raise and increase in their fundraising bonus.  In fact, the organization itself is on the brink of collapse.  Programming has been cut, they are planning on moving out of their warehouse space and the collective members can’t even afford to pay themselves anymore.

At Jimmy John’s, the bosses spent about $3,000 a day over the course of a month and half on a union busting consulting firm called the Labor Relations Institute.  They also spent an incredible amount of money on lawyers and legal fees fighting the Unfair Labor Practice charges we filed against them.  Additionally, the pickets we held at stores, the phone blasts we did that shut down over-the-phone delivery orders at stores, and the negative media attention the company received during the union drive certainly reduced their revenue.  In all, simply giving us what we were demanding (a $1 an hour raise for all drivers and supervisors and a $2 an hour raise for all inshoppers) would have cost them less money than fighting us for so long.  The threat that unions will be bring financial hardship to a company is typically nothing but an empty threat o scare the workers.

The IWW is an aggressive organization with scary politics that is using you to achieve its political agenda. They will harass and trick you. We can protect you from them.

In all union drives, unions in general are criticized (even while praised as mentioned earlier).  Attention will be drawn to various aspects of unions that can be framed in an unpopular light.  These aspects include expensive mandatory union dues, union bureaucrats making decisions on the workers behalf, a complicated grievance process, and your dues money being given to politicians without the workers say.

In the IWW, none of these criticisms apply since our union doesn’t share those characteristics common to other unions.  Instead, we Wobblies are criticized in other ways.  Most commonly we are red-baited.  At Jimmy John’s, we were called radicals, anarchists, communists, socialists, anti-capitalists, anti-Americans, terrorists (yes, seriously!), troublemakers, zealots, and so on.  We were told that we were being aggressive toward the company and attempting to bully the bosses into submission.  We were accused of violent tactics including sabotaging the company’s equipment and inventory of products.  During our sick day campaign and subsequent firings, the company’s lawyers tried to argue our campaign for sick days constituted extortion.

At Sisters’ Camelot, similar accusations have been levied against the canvassers.  They have been accused of being aggressive and being bullies for simply making demands and going on strike after the collective refused to negotiate with them.  When the canvassers escalated and turned up the pressure, the collective members (and their friends who were also targeted) became downright hysterical.  At Jimmy John’s, when we announced ourselves as the Jimmy John’s Workers Union and presented our demands, the bosses thought we were being aggressive even then as well.  When we became aggressive for real, our bosses demonized us even more.  However, they did begin to give in on some demands, including less tangible ones like better treatment of workers by management.  The lesson to be learned here is that bosses don’t respond to simple requests to change things at work.  They aren’t convinced by others moralizing or arguing with them.  They are convinced when its in their own self interest to change.  And that usually comes about when severe economic, social, and/or emotional pressure is put on them.  Exerting these types of pressure was the JJWU strategy and it is also SCCU’s strategy, and the strategy of all militant unions.

A cornerstone in the union busting arsenal, used by the bosses against unions of all stripes including the IWW, is to paint the union as a separate entity from the worker’s themselves with a separate agenda from the workers.  We call this “3rd party-ing” the union.

At Jimmy John’s, this message was a core part of the bosses’ narrative.  In one of the company’s propaganda posters they stated the IWW was using the workers to advance their political cause and the company was helping their (the workers) cause.

Sisters’ Camelot and their supporters have also painted the IWW as a third party with an agenda separate from the workers.  When the strike first started, members of the community publicly attacked the IWW for “going after” Sisters’ Camelot saying we were racist and that we are against poor people.  Likewise, the Community Statement attempted to separate the agenda of the canvassers from the IWW as well (more on this in Part 2).  Notice they didn’t say this about the canvassers themselves, just the IWW.  This implies two things.  One it implies the IWW has a sinister motive that is separate from the canvassers struggle to gain control over their work environment.  Second, it implies that the IWW are really the ones in the driver seat and not the canvassers.  In reality, the canvassers make all their own decisions.  They don’t need to have their decisions or strategies approved by any other IWW body. While individual Wobblies offer advice and input, the canvassers themselves call all the shots.  This narrative constructed by the Sisters’ Camelot collective and their supporters ignores the agency of the canvassers and implies that a union campaign involves a group of professionals that parachute in and rescue workers instead of a struggle involving those directly affected.

There is a certain individual that is causing problems for all of us. They are hostile, manipulative and disruptive, and they are destroying our relationship with you. They have ulterior motives. We will all be better off without them.

In many union drives, certain individuals and/or social groups will be singled out and scapegoated as the main agitators and instigators to de-legitimize the union campaign.  This, among other things, takes the focus off the experiences, grievances, and demands of the workers.

At Jimmy John’s, certain organizers were singled out due to their well known pasts as IWW organizers in other high profile union campaigns.  Additionally, there were attempts to marginalize certain social groups that were seen as the home base of the core organizers of the campaign. Attempts were made by the company to paint the union as young, white male delivery drivers from the southside of Minneapolis.  When the company decided to clean house and fire a group of core organizers after a very threatening escalation tactic taken by the union surrounding a sick day campaign, the bosses specifically decided to fire only six workers, all of whom were white and male from the same social scene.  The core organizers who were women or people of color were only disciplined, but not fired.  As a result, the company was able to frame a narrative of the union being for certain workers and not others.  The phrase “drivers union” became common in the shop among workers who became convinced of the bosses narrative and is still used by many workers who weren’t part of the campaign at its height.

At Sisters’ Camelot, a very similar anti-union message has been created.  Instead of addressing the workers actual demands, the Sisters’ Camelot managing collective shifted the focus to one worker who they accused of theft, being abusive, and manipulating the rest of the canvassers into forming the union.  They and their supporters have continually made the entire struggle about this one worker and not about the concerns of all of them.  This is done to distract people from the real issues at stake, the experiences, grievances, and demands of the workers.

The Dirty Truth: Bosses Will Lie.

A final characteristic of anti-union campaigns is a barrage of lies and half-truths coming from management.  At Jimmy John’s, our committee spent an enormous amount of energy refuting the spin management put on the organizing campaign.  The aftermath of the Jimmy John’s union recognition election is an excellent example. After we narrowly lost our union election, but Unfair Labor Practice charges against the company nullified its results, the company put out a statement addressing the election and subsequent labor board settlement resulting from the ULPs.  In the statement, they claimed the labor board only found merit with one third of all the ULPs we filed.  In reality, they only investigated a third of the ULPs and found merit with all but two of them (out of more than 20).  The labor board found these ULPs to be sufficient to rule the election null and void.  If the company had decided to go to court instead of taking a settlement, the labor board would have investigated the rest of the ULPs.  The statement also claimed that we admitted in the settlement that the company committed no wrongdoing.  In reality, the settlement contained a clause stating the company is not admitting to violating Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act (which protects concerted activity of workers), which both parties agreed to.  The labor board agent explained to us this was a standard clause in all settlements involving first time offenders of Section 7.

The Sisters’ Camelot collective published a FAQ and a letter making several claims that are manipulative and spun to hide the truth.  For instance, the collective has claimed that their collective is an open one which anyone who meets the requirements can join.  What they conveniently omit is the fact that any collective member can block any potential applicant from joining for any reason.  The collective has also claimed that none of the collective members are paid.  In reality, the position of collective member is a non-paid volunteer position, but all the current collective members also hold paid positions within the organization which only collective members can hold.  In another statement, they claimed that the canvass union went on strike about an hour after giving their demands.  They fail to mention that the collective flat out refused to negotiate with the union, which caused the strike to happen.  Similarly, at the NLRB trial to reinstate the fired canvasser, a collective member testified saying the canvassers wanted a few of their demands met the first day of negotiations.  She also claimed the canvassers said they were going to go on strike at the beginning of negotiations.  The reality is quite different.  The canvassers asked the collective to pick a one or two demands that they could begin negotiations on that day.  They didn’t say they wanted them to agree to them on that day.  Furthermore, they stated at the beginning of the negotiations they were willing to go on strike if the collective refused to negotiate in good faith.  These are but a few examples of the many lies and half-truths the collective has spun to manipulate the truth.  In doing so, they behaved as any other boss: dishonest and manipulative.

This strike, which has now dragged on for over four months, has revealed many things about the nature of the Sisters’ Camelot organization, its bosses, and those so-called “radicals” in the community who support the status quo at Sisters’.  Those who have defended the collective have done so largely in blind defense of the collective model.  And in doing so, they have caused the organization to nearly be destroyed.

No matter how much they claim to be anti-authoritarian, their actions speak more truth than the identities they subscribe to.

Proudly, Defiantly, & Unapologetically Wobbly,

Travis & Robbie

Twin Cities IWW (Personal Capacity)

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